tulip walk

tulip walk

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Lessons Learned

Since Mom has been back from her trip, she has been thinking very hard on what she actually learned.
She will be writing off this trip for business and also applying for continued education credits with the Oregon Landscape Contractors Board. Win-Win!        So Mom......
What do the British gardeners do differently from their U.S. counterparts?
A 450 year old Chestnut Tree

They seem to have more patience. Maybe because they have such history. 
Most British gardeners don't seem to mind that a hedge, a covered arbor or an espaliered tree may take a hundred plus years to reach perfection.
They don't seem to mind manual labor as much as Americans. I saw very few power tools and no automatic sprinklers.
They really prepare the soil......REALLY prepare!
With layers and layers of soil amendments, turned into the soil with a shovel or a large spading fork.
They dig and divide their perennials often and think nothing of pulling everything out, fixing up the soil and replanting entire borders.
So much work, but worth the reward.

No more shortcuts back home, if we want these results!

Yet, they are not perfectionists. Most gardens were very informal, with a highly orchestrated unkempt look.

Making notes to seed some pretty things in the cracks of our pavers and stop wasting so much time, trying to keep them perfectly clean and weed free!

Many Thanks to all of our lovely hosts and guides along the way.
The Brits are a warm, funny and generous bunch.

We had a fabulous time.

The food was GREAT!

......with the exception of the mushy peas.

Cheers!!

(Now, back to our regular programming...more Wyatt!!)




19 comments:

  1. What a lovely trip and such an opportunity! Maybe one of my ancestors were British, I tend to think along their gardening lines. Glad you are home. I bet Wyatt and Stanzie really missed you!

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  2. I have to tell you that Gail has missed out on that British gene for patient gardening...
    But we're so glad you enjoyed your trip to what is still, for now, the United Kingdom.
    Toodle pip!
    Bertie.

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  3. It's all that hard yakka that makes a good garden. Probably why ours is only satisfactory.....BOL! We prefer to go for walks.

    XXXOOO Bella Roxy & Dui

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  4. I was just thinking the same thing...what an AWESOME opportunity to see all of those beautiful gardens!! To be honest, I think I'd be a little afraid to travel so far away!! We have truly enjoyed all of the lovely pictures you have shared with us! Thanks so much!

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  5. It is something I miss...here in the USA everyone's gardens seem pretty much the same - conformity is the best way to describe it. Home owners associations have a lot to answer for in that department. I love the rambling individualism other countries have

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  6. I think you summed up the differences very well. Gardening is a national pastime here and it more of an enjoyment than a chore. You are so right about it being more manual as we look at time spent in the garden as something to be relished. Have a wonderful Wednesday.
    Best wishes Molly

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  7. What an amazing trip. Thanks for sharing your experiences.

    I agree with Reilly's Mom there is much to be blamed on forced conformity. My wild gardens would never exist in a place with a home owner's association. However, that was a choice we made when looking for a house. I didn't want to live under someone else's control telling me what could and couldn't be done with my yard.

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  8. WE know a tiny bit about how much the Brits Love their gardens... there was a lady from THERE that married a soldier and moved to the town near us. The front of her property was AMAZINGLY Beautiful... and she Worked in it constantly. Mom talked to her often and once asked about the VARIETY and RIOT of COLOR that she had. Answer... YES Dear, We LOVE CONTROLLED CHAOS .

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  9. I wish I could be so patient and so hard-working like the british gardeners. I've read they even have special boxes with worms to prepare the soil. Mom is drooling on the keyboard since she saw the fish&chips... I better give her a tissue :o)

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  10. We have so enjoyed every picture of your mom's trip, Wyatt! To be able to walk in these gardens and see and smell everything is such a treat! Our mom is so jealous!
    Red lupines? Really? Mom is going to be needing these!

    Love ya lots♥
    Mitch and Molly

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  11. Mom loves the look of the British gardens. Such absolutely beautiful pictures.
    thanks for sharing your trip
    hugs
    Mr Bailey, Hazel & Greta

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  12. Oh, every time Ma watches a British movie or TV show, she is always lookin' at the marvelous gardens and how you just want to sit and have a cuppa.
    Not like Ma and her murderous ways....
    Oh, and yes, MORE WYATT! bol
    Kisses,
    Ruby ♥

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  13. What a fun time. Mom loves looking at gardens and we love eating the dirt
    Lily & Edward

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  14. beautiful photos and yes Wyatt the last photo was the best.

    Aroo to you,
    Sully

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  15. Beautiful post, I like that un-kept look!

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  16. What a beautiful garden :-)

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  17. Oh, yes. Mushy peas are not my fave either! I like the 'weeds in the paver plantings' approach. Works for me!

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  18. We Americans are not big on manual labor OR patience! But the gardens you pictured ARE simply lovely and inviting.

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